David Horvitz – Dedicated to Forgotten Oceans

Opens 23rd September
Opening reception 12th October 6.30pm
at the window of Davish News
30 New Kent Road
London SE1 6TJ
Next to The Coronet Theatre

For Barnie’s inaugural exhibition David Horvitz will show a collection of photographs-cum-postcards in the windows of multiple Off Licences around London.

The exhibition is the culmination of a year and a half of irregular hand- and type-written postal correspondence between the two of us. David being in Los Angeles and Barnie in London. We used this archaic mode of communication as a tool to counter the high speed communication to which we’ve become accustomed during every second of our waking (and sometimes sleeping) lives. It was a way to avoid digital communication’s demanding nature, its tendency to create stress, exhaustion, and distraction. We used it as an attempt to work without deadlines, to let words and ideas come without rush, to slow down time.

The exhibited postcards come from an archive of photographs inside David’s studio. Since the early 2000’s he has been making daily digital snap shot photographs. Overwhelmed, anxious, and not knowing what to do with this continuously growing digital archive of thousands and thousands of images sitting in folders on hard-drives, he has begun to slowly erase them. But before permanently deleting the file he makes one small print. So this print is the last remaining trace of the digital file.

For this exhibition David selected photographs depicting the ocean from this archive, and mailed them to Barnie as postcards. Some David remembers their locations, but many he has forgotten where they were taken. Maybe they are from his road trip up the California coast making his Public Access project in 2010, or maybe they depict a location somewhere near an exhibition or residency he was invited to. Or a trip with a friend to Tijuana to look at the Mexican-American border. Even though the locations might be forgotten, each image attests to his presence and being someplace in the world.

The photographs will be exhibited on rotation in the community notice boards/low budget advertising spaces found in the windows of newsagents, off licences and corner shops across London.

– David Horvitz and Barnie Page

The addresses of the windows where photographs are installed will be listed here.

Davish News, 30 New Kent Road, London, SE1 6TJ

Priceless Food and Wine, 121 Queens Road, London, SE15 2EZ

Millenium Food & Wine, 119 Kennington Road, London, SE11 6SF

David Horvitz (b. 1981, Los Angeles, USA) lives and works in Los Angeles. He studied at the UC Riverside and received his MFA from the Bard College.

Unfolding as a series of ongoing actions, David Horvitz’s projects often subvert standardized systems and patterns of circulation, finding loopholes and alternative logics within them.

Recent solo exhibitions include: “Eridanus”, Galerie Allen, Paris, 2017; Concurrent solo exhibitions “ja” at Chert, Berlin and “oui” at Yvon Lambert Bookshop, Paris, 2016; “Situation #20”, Fotomuseum Winterthur, 2015; “David Horvitz”, Blum & Poe, Los Angeles, 2014; “Gnomons” New Museum, 2014; concurrent shows at Jan Mot, Brussels, and Dawid Radziszewski Gallery, Warsaw, 2014; “POST”, Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, 2013.

His works has been exhibited in numerous group exhibitions, in venues such as Palais de Tokyo, Paris (upcoming); Pirelli HangarBicocca, Milan (upcoming); Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen; Knockdown Center, New York; Criée centre of contemporary art, Rennes, France; for the Public Art Fund 40th Anniversary in several venues in New York; Project 88, Colaba, Mumbai; MOCAK, Krakow, 2016; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; Volcano Extravaganza, Stromboli; MoMA, New York; Crac Alsace, Altkirsch and Brooklyn Museum.

Further projects include David Horvitz’s presentation at Frieze Projects, New York, 2016 and Porcino Gallery, Berlin, which he founded in 2013.

His works is in important collection such as Nomas Foundation, Rome; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; Moma Library, New York; Le Silo– Collection Billarant, Paris; Fotomuseum Winterthur.